Tools of the Trade

Because I have page proofs and I cannot stand to look for any more errors at this time of night, I thought I would take a few minutes to talk about the tools of my trade.

I use a Macbook Pro as my main writing machine. This is not a religious stance; I have a PC (an Asus), on which I play games. I fully believe that a writer is more than the sum of his or her tools, and that each of us should work on whatever platform we find most comfortable.

This is my way of saying that if the comments descend into platform wars, I will moderate with the world’s heaviest hand, possibly because I have read it so many times and there is nothing new.

On the other hand, if anyone has suggestions for PC equivalents of the Mac only apps I list here, that would be great!

——

The first application I use — and the one I would not be without if you paid me — is Scrivener. It started life because Keith Blount was trying to write a novel, and he found none of the programs he tried up to the task of handling his process. He was not, before Scrivener, a programmer. I find his creation incredibly impressive because of this.

There are probably a thousand ways to use Scrivener; I’m not a power-user. Most of its features are features that don’t suit my writing process, so I don’t use them. The ability to break text into scenes, partial scenes, that follow a loose/tight outline doesn’t work for me; I know writers who love the program because it allows them to move whole scenes from one part of their novel to another with just a drag-and-drop. I know people who make really smart use of the filing card view as well, to denote which chapters are viewpoint chapters, or which chapters are heavy action and which are quieter. It’s not a view I use, but if you head to their web-site, you can see it in action.

I write sequentially, chapter-by-chapter, scene by scene. When I revise, depending on the book, I will sometimes break chapters into their component parts – but folder them so they’re contiguous when exported. I can tag those scenes in any way I like, and will often tag them for their structural components: things that are necessary, things that aren’t.

Only when I’ve finished a novel do I make use of the “export draft” feature, which exports the entire book as a single file, in whatever format I choose. It will change underlines to italics or vice versa, keep a running page count, and keep a wordcount if that’s necessary.

Scrivener 2.0 will also export to epub. This takes a bit of set-up and experimentation, but once it is set-up, it works like a charm, and produces compliant epubs. It will export to .pdf, .doc, .rtf and .txt as well.

At 45.00 U.S., it’s a bargain; it’s one of the few programs I own that I would pay old-school money for, if it came to that. There is a PC version of Scrivener in beta.

——

Microsoft Word wasn’t always a necessity, but as more and more publishers make use of track changes for line-edits and copy-edits, it’s become necessary for me. All of my Luna line-edits and copy-edits are now sent in .doc or .docx format. For that reason, I have MS Word 2011 for the Mac in my toolset. I found 2011 a good upgrade because it’s faster than the prior version for the Mac, and I find the layout of track changes clearer and easier to address.

I use it only for publisher-sent copy-edits, but those are necessary.

——

Flying Meat’s VoodooPad is a wiki app. I don’t have an on-line wiki–although with very little effort, I could, thanks to VoodooPad.

Why do I use it?

I keep track of the bits and pieces of information about my various worlds and the novels written in them. If I create a page for a character, every incidence of the character’s name will automatically link to that page. If I’m too lazy to do a find I just type the name in a random on-screen page and click it. I have my time-line, which is the longest single page, my gods, my visible magical effects, magic items, loose ends, characters, etc., stored in VoodooPad; it’s like a hyperlinked notebook.

You can make the pages look nice; since I’m not an .html wiz, I don’t. Except for the fonts. It’s a way of keeping the information I need in a form I can easily revise and add information to, without having a million smaller documents.

I don’t think there’s a PC version of VoodooPad, but I’d be really surprised if there wasn’t a similar application available for Windows.

——

I have the Oxford English Dictionary as my main dictionary. No, it wasn’t cheap – but I made humongous puppy dog eyes at everyone in my family at Christmas time. I really like the OED; it’s very comprehensive, and I find it fascinating to look at the first (known) use of various English words.

The port is not a pretty port. It confounds the operating system by ignoring most of the basic rules that otherwise govern application interfaces. The review I’ve linked I linked because it’s hysterically funny.

But to be perfectly fair, the PC port is equally horrible, and also ignores Windows paradigms. You don’t buy the OED because you expect it to be pretty, or well-behaved.

—–

Although it doesn’t directly apply to writing, I use DevonThink as a general aggregator/database, as well. I clip web-pages, throw in .docs and .pdfs, and keep receipts. Again, I’m not a poweruser, and while mail can be archived in Devonthink, I don’t because I can’t stand the messy way it looks. Devonthink has a great search engine, as well, so all the bits and pieces of on-the-fly “that might be useful” web pages or emails that come my way get tossed into the in-box. It’s the equivalent of the shoe-box for the pre-computer age. There are very flexible ways of arranging the data: in folders, with tags, in separate databases with clones (business, writing, home).

Not everyone is going to love this, but it means I have things in one place instead of all over the drive. If you don’t want or need multiple databases, there are similar apps that people love: Yojimbo, by Barebones, has a really lovely interface, and it’s very intuitive; Notebook by Circus Ponies, which allows the same clipping and pasting of any information (they have better integration with the overall contextual menus than Devonthink), but contains it in a “Notebook”, a visual, literal scrapbook.

I tried them all, which is why I mention them — Devonthink is, imho, the ugliest. But it does a few things the others don’t.

I’m certain there must be PC equivalents.

——

I want to put in a plug for software that’s in beta at the moment, even if I’m not up and running at 100%: Aeon Timeline. Aeon Timeline is timeline software, yes – but it does a few things that are incredibly useful. Entities are defined as character, places, etc. When a character first appears in a time-line event, you can set the characters age at that time — and every time the character appears on the time line, his or her age will be noted. This is helpful when you’ve flubbed ages because you’re writing at 4:40 in the morning. You can set locations and characters and look at all events on the timeline that involve them, as well; you can have multiple characters marked for the same events. You can tag all entries and search on or show tagged entries.

If I did not have 11 books worth of time-line events, I’d be using this now, because it also allows you to define your own calendar year – with month names, day lengths, etc. So for those whose fantasy calendars don’t precisely match our own, it’s ideal. When I have time, I add more of the timeline on flat paper to the program; if I’d had this years ago, would have added events as they occurred, and I would have loved it like a crazy person.

29 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. RKCharron
    May 27, 2011 @ 10:37:35

    Hi Michelle :)
    I found this very interesting and helpful.
    I understand these applications a lot better now.
    Thank you very much for taking the time to share.
    All the best,
    Rob

    Reply

  2. Aaron
    May 27, 2011 @ 11:01:33

    *Double take*

    What sort of games does someone like Michelle Sagara West play?

    Reply

    • Michelle Sagara
      May 28, 2011 @ 20:12:15

      What sort of games does someone like Michelle Sagara West play?

      You will note (maybe) the dedication in Cast in Secret. I deserted my guild for three weeks to finish that book, and it was during the last days before Naxxramus 40-man would become irrelevant, so they were trying to finish as much of it as they could. If the dedication makes no sense to you, it was World of Warcraft.

      I stopped raiding completely three years ago and at the moment I’m a very casual player (as in, haven’t logged in in three months). But I’m looking forward to Diablo 3. I am, sadly, crap at FPS’s, and the only PS3 game I’ve played involved me badgering someone else so I could watch (Final Fantasy 13, and the second of a series that I’m blanking on; it’s an Indiana Jones riff but set in the present.)

      Reply

      • Randall
        May 29, 2011 @ 18:58:03

        the only PS3 game I’ve played involved me badgering someone else so I could watch (Final Fantasy 13, and the second of a series that I’m blanking on; it’s an Indiana Jones riff but set in the present.)

        Uncharted? Or one of the Tomb Raiders, but I’d guess Uncharted.

        Reply

  3. Michael
    May 27, 2011 @ 11:23:12

    “I don’t have an on-line wiki…”

    The question here is: Why not?!

    I would love to wile away the hours reading through this kind of background content on your work. I would especially love to see your timelines and character sketches. And your calendar. And your pantheon(s). And your notes on places we’ve never been. And places we have. And pretty much anything you could possibly share about your worlds.

    Of course I’ve wanted this (or something like it) for about as long as I’ve been reading your books (16 years? 17?), so we’re unsurprised.

    Reply

    • Michelle Sagara
      May 28, 2011 @ 20:23:17

      “I don’t have an on-line wiki…”

      The question here is: Why not?!

      I would love to wile away the hours reading through this kind of background content on your work. I would especially love to see your timelines and character sketches.

      The answer is: anything that exists on my machine – and only mine – isn’t yet public. It’s incubating. It’s in the chrysalid state. Some of my longish notes on The Ten were written long before I’d set word in Averalaan – and they changed a lot as I began to write. Not the structure of The Ten, and not the reason for their existence – but the characters, the interactions, the internal house things. My husband thought he could GM something decent from those notes. But…

      This is why I don’t outline. I can come up with something that makes perfect sense on the page. But as I approach page, the things that make sense shift. Characters will say things in conversation that I hadn’t planned – and when it’s on the page, it’s so cleary the right thing that I ditch the planned element.

      I won’t say that the books write themselves; they don’t. I will say that my subconscious continues to mull over the characters and the world. I have a terrible time writing something with no warning. If someone offered me 10k to write one short story, yes, I’d try – but if it were due tomorrow I’d also ask “Does it have to be good?”

      Sorry, digression there. The point is that the wiki I do have changes. The oldest of stuff isn’t part of the wiki; I’ve never important the Hunter information in part because I don’t have anything that can read the old formats they were done in (Clarisworks), and the one thing I desperately want is the colour coding for rank, and the actual titles as one progresses toward Hunter Green.

      The time-line doesn’t change. But it is very, very sketchy. It is not the clean and well organized/formatted/consistently-styled information that would normally be exposed to readers; it’s my patchwork of notes-on-the-fly so I can look up times, dates, etc., when I’ve forgotten them (I’m not really good at remember dates in real life, either). My character list is not entirely complete, or rather, there’s one very long list and then three or four shorter lists, which, because of the wiki, can easily be reached. But again – it’s not consistent, and it would take a lot of work to move things around to make it so.

      I would also have to strip out the spoiler bits, because they’re littered throughout, as well. I think I once emailed a reader my month-names calendar and only realized after that there’s a large future spoiler in it; I’d just cut and paste >.<

      Reply

      • Michael
        May 28, 2011 @ 21:08:03

        GMing something in your world is *exactly* why I want your notes. The world of the West novels is my favorite fantasy world (ever), and there is little I want more than to immerse myself in lore of the setting.

        With many novels and settings, I am careful to avoid spoilers, yet for some reason with yours I just want to know more. More. MORE! All the time. The few tidbits I’ve wheedled out of you I mull over and examine again and again. It’s a bit of an obsession, really. There is no book I’ve read more often than I’ve read Hunter’s Death. There is no character in fiction that I love reading about more than Jewel.

        So while I understand and appreciate the lack of a public wiki, I am nonetheless going to go over there and pout until the next Cast book comes out. Maybe I’ll reread all the West novels while I’m waiting; in chronological order, this time.

        Reply

        • Erin
          Jun 03, 2011 @ 20:57:44

          I’m not a fan of spoilers, EVER. HOWEVER, I can say that Jewel is also my favorite character and I too have lost count of the times I’ve read Hunter’s Death…I had to buy a second copy of the book after the first one died! :-D

  4. Genna Warner
    May 27, 2011 @ 13:15:12

    I would love to see the wiki and timeline posted somewhere on the web site. I understand that since you are constantly using it for the books you are writing now, that publishing it might give things away you don’t what to have out yet. But it would be great to have all the known time line out there for readers to reference.

    Reply

  5. Shayla
    May 27, 2011 @ 14:32:21

    Thanks for this! I’m going to have to check out Aeon and Devonthink. I just started using Scrivener in the last few weeks and I already love it, but I’m definitely in need of a timeline tool… I’m forever jumping back in my work wondering, ‘did they do that two days, or four? what was character x wearing yesterday?’

    Oh, and one more thing: Chapters has Cast in Ruin listed as a Sept 20th release… is that correct? Sometimes they mess with us :D

    Reply

    • Michelle Sagara
      May 28, 2011 @ 20:26:37

      Oh, and one more thing: Chapters has Cast in Ruin listed as a Sept 20th release… is that correct? Sometimes they mess with us :D

      It is correct. The official publication date is October 2011 – but in general, books for October sales dates are shipped in mid-late September. October is the time at which any store that ordered the (physical) copies should have them in the store. It’s imprecise because they have to be delivered to warehouses, and then to distributor’s warehouses, and then to stores.

      But I would expect to see it in the stores by then :)

      Reply

  6. Christina Tsichlis
    May 27, 2011 @ 23:23:21

    Hi Michelle,

    I would like to add my support of Scrivener. I cannot do without it. It is an amazing program. I’ve recommended it to my writing friends because it has all the feasible ways that I organize myself AND allows me to color-code easily. I’ve put my entire binder of information and about half of my randomly collected papers/images into that program and it’s all easily accessible and organized. What more could a writer ask for?

    I’m looking into Aeon Timeline and VoodooPad because they just sound like interesting and useful programs. I’ve never heard of either of them and one thing I love doing is trying out applications and seeing if they work for me and streamline some of my process. Thanks for writing about what works for you.

    Reply

  7. hjbau
    May 28, 2011 @ 00:06:54

    Does that mean you actually have a timeline somewhere of Evayne? I have always wondered where she has come from when she jumps into a scene. If she was just somewhere we were before or will be in the future. I can only imagine the complication of a character that jumps threw time let alone the normal everyday characters who travel normally threw time.

    Thank you for this information.

    Reply

    • Michelle Sagara
      May 28, 2011 @ 20:29:11

      Does that mean you actually have a timeline somewhere of Evayne?

      Evayne is not on the official time-line; I have a much smaller, and much much messier, time-line of her *age*, and I add events to her age. Honestly, she is logistically the worst character ever in terms of difficulty. Not in terms of writing her; in that way she’s easier because a sixteen year old who has just walked away from the life she wanted to keep is a much different person from the fifty-five year old upon whom the fate of the world depends.

      But in terms of continuity bits – yes. I’m sure I’ve dropped the ball somewhere >.<

      Reply

      • hjbau
        May 28, 2011 @ 23:15:56

        I haven’t noticed any ball dropping. I bet Evayne can be a pain in that regards. I could imagine that having a timeline of the order of her life events so far may be spoilery. I have always wanted to try and figure it out just because there are times when i wonder if she has just jumped from somewhere we have previously seen to where she is now.

        You have done a great job at making the character still seem to be consistently the same character just changed because of age. It is fascinating to see a character’s growth come and go as she pops through time and also to see others reaction to her. Very fascinating character.

        Reply

      • Kurt
        May 29, 2011 @ 10:05:08

        This is interesting to hear you say. I’ve always enjoyed, as and exercise in perspective, to view the West universe as a non-linear telling of Evayne’s life rather than a linear telling of the lives of the other characters. She is my favourite character in your novels (the trinity of Kallandras, Meralonne and Isladar being excluded of course).

        Reply

      • Erin
        Jun 03, 2011 @ 21:12:21

        I would guess that Evayne is probably the only character that you can get away with small lapses in continuity without any “trouble!” Who’s to say that she can’t be in two places at the same time?! I assume that young Evayne might be able to be in the same day as old Evayne; when you can step through time and space isn’t anything possible? I enjoy reading the books too much to get very picky with the small details anyway. So I try not to sweat the small stuff! Besides, the stories are all so complex! I can’t imagine anyone could get it all written without a few mistakes.

        Reply

      • Hilda
        Jun 19, 2011 @ 23:03:51

        I still don’t understand Evayne too well, maybe because she comes and goes too fast in the books, so she lacks the continuity the other characters have. Her age every time seems irrelevant (I may need to read her scenes again). I think she would be a very difficult character for a writer to handle, because the writer has to purposely remember inserting her in a scene.

        Reply

  8. Hugh Shannon Myers
    May 28, 2011 @ 00:38:05

    Certainly can’t speak with any authority, but I can point out that from clues Evayne mentions (or doesn’t wish to talk about!) the oldest things she seems to have seen are the execution of Myrddion and a ‘silent’ answer when asked if she had met Veralaan. At the other end of time so to speak is the short scene where she finds Kallandras on a battle fields and she helps him move away. Given her geas, she probably ranges over the entire time span of all of the books. Don’t know for sure, but I’d not be surprised if she hadn’t had some experience with both the first-born and the Cities of Man as well…

    Reply

  9. hjbau
    May 28, 2011 @ 01:12:07

    There is a moment where Evayne comes to Stephen and she has just killed her first man and i always wonder who that was. I always wonder if it is obvious, but maybe it hasn’t been said yet. I am not sure that we have seen Evayne kill anyone yet but it is possible she just means that she is coming from the first death that she feels she caused through her interference. Anyone else have any thoughts on that? I am not sure which book that was in. I would guess Hunter’s Death on their way to Averalaan.

    I have been looking at this Scrivener program. Very interesting.

    Reply

    • Michael
      May 28, 2011 @ 02:31:30

      It is HD. When Stephan comforts her without asking questions was one of the best memories she had. It was only after she took them on the Winter road on Scarran that she realized that even that had its purpose (to keep her robe from devouring Stephan).

      If I recall correctly, there was blood on her hands (but not her robes), implying that she had killed this person herself. I do not believe the identity of the person was ever revealed, though.

      My question is how Evayne, Arianne, and Sor Na Shannen are in both the Undercity and outside Averalaan on Scarran in 410 AA. Was this an accident?

      Reply

      • Hugh Shannon Myers
        May 28, 2011 @ 03:22:22

        In Hunter’s Oath, Evayne, Espere and Kallandras are all in the Undercity—this happens before Hunter’s Death. Scene starts page 115 I think…don’t remember if they confront Shannen there. Not sure about Arianne either.

        Reply

      • hjbau
        May 28, 2011 @ 03:49:47

        Well i have always been interested in where Evayne was coming from in that scene and who she killed. The blood could have been from someone she held as they died so it could still be someone whose death she is responsible for through her interference whereas i agree it is also just as possible that it is someone she actually killed.

        I have always wondered about Evayne’s timeline as it stands now, but it is hard to figure out the order of events from her point of view there is just so much and we don’t know enough at this point. Such a great character.

        Reply

  10. Ann Kopchik
    May 28, 2011 @ 19:30:02

    Scrivener still scares me.

    I know, I know. But all the extras you can do stuff with make me start thinking I should outline and keep little bits of things organized and start doing things *right* (which is a falsehood, since the process that’s right for a writer is the one that *works*) so I drive my anxiety up with thoughts of having to sit down and do a bunch of stuff to be able to write… rather than just writing…

    So, I just write in Pages and keep a lot of stickies. Which, you know, I could do in Scrivener…

    Heh. I’m my own worst enemy, sometimes.

    Reply

  11. Michelle Sagara
    May 28, 2011 @ 20:53:52

    Scrivener still scares me.

    I know, I know. But all the extras you can do stuff with make me start thinking I should outline and keep little bits of things organized and start doing things *right* (which is a falsehood, since the process that’s right for a writer is the one that *works*) so I drive my anxiety up with thoughts of having to sit down and do a bunch of stuff to be able to write… rather than just writing…

    So, I just write in Pages and keep a lot of stickies. Which, you know, I could do in Scrivener…

    A). What is this outline you speak of? I can’t do them >.>

    B) The only reason I am at all organized with regards to information about the Empire and Breodanir and the Dominion is because I needed to figure out a lot of it before I put words on the page. My characters – or my subconscious – is alway smarter than I am. But I need to feed it something before it starts to process. The more I feed it, the more naturally cultural state of mind, phrases, and actions come through when I do at last start writing them.

    But: I did not do that at all for my first four novels. I think process evolves as we learn what both our strengths and our weaknesses are.

    However, the real reason I started to use Scrivener was not for its host of really useful features. The truth is I wrote every novel until HIDDEN CITY in MS Word (with two books in ClarisWorks in between, and to be fair, the first five were in MS Word for DOS). Because MS Word was not famed for its stability, I wrote in chapter files – one file per chapter. But for the Luna CAST novels, this wasn’t helpful, because I would then have to somehow merge them into one file in order to submit. And yes, of course it’s possible in Word – but it’s a total pain, and for someone who doesn’t need to do it more than once a year? I’d have to look it up and learn how to do it all over again each time.

    So I used Scrivener because I could write (and export) one chapter at a time. They were all in one place, and flipping between chapters did not involve the torturous slow opening of multiple Word documents (and the inevitable slow down or crash of Word), so that was a huge, huge bonus – but the thing that clinched it for me is that exporting my separate chapters to a single document file was easy and took seconds.

    I realize that this is possibly the worst publicly stated reason for using Scrivener, but there you have it

    The rest of the features that I do use I discovered in a haphazard fashion as I became totally comfortable with the very very basic uses to which I put the program.

    I clip more research files and add them to the Scrivener book file now than I ever used to, but the first two books I wrote in Scrivener were written a chapter at a time. The bits and pieces of functionality I now use, I’ve added — slowly — into the mix.

    However!

    Writing in Pages is probably very similar. There is no reason at all to change tools when you’re comfortable with the ones you have. I pick up tools based on two things: OMG SHINY (bad habit of mine >.>) and need. Also, I think Pages from the iPad to Pages on the Mac is probably smoother than Dropbox for Scrivener, but I don’t know.

    Need – avoiding ever merging a second book of 24 separate files into a single word document. (Shiny: epub export that after initial set up works in seconds.)

    Need – single document for worldbuilding details/time-line/bit characters that I will Totally Forget the name of in six years.

    I admit DEVONThink started out as Shiny and fell into Need as I used it. I am conflicted about trying Tinderbox because it’s yet another organizational tool but – Shiny >.< I have bunches of little apps (clipboard apps, menu/folder apps) which I didn't mention. But most of what I try, I don't use. I tried other writing programs for the Mac, as well.

    Reply

    • Ann Kopchik
      May 28, 2011 @ 23:17:49

      A) I have no idea. I’ve heard mysterious rumors about them. (Outlines also make my anxiety rise. Which isn’t to say that I don’t plan… I just don’t fix anything down until its ready.)

      B) Ah! I write entirely in one file per book in Pages. And I hardly ever write out of sequence, so that works fine.

      Pages behaves just fine with large files, and there are some cool things I *really* like, like the search sidebar. It lists every instance of a word you type in a clip of a sentence and you can just click the line to go there (much like searching in a PDF). It’s great because I usually can remember lines or a combo of words for a scene and find the scene like *magic*. Or if I need to change a name, I can see every instance at once.

      iPad*Pages>Mac*Pages is fairly smooth. I’ve used that quite often.

      I really should do something about a timeline. >.< I already found an issue between two books. Luckily, I'm unpublished, so I can still *fix* it. But it reminded me that I need to pay more attention to those things. I used to be able to keep all this stuff in my *head*. Alas, no more.

      I think the thing with Scriviner is that I like the idea. And I especially like that it's not a tool from a big corporate conglomerate and that its designed with writers in mind. I'd *like* to be able to use it. But for now, I think Pages works.

      Also: I may be able to read Clarisworks files. I know I have before because some of my old work is stuck in .cwk format and I've been able to get those files to rise from the dead. But I haven't done it in a while…

      Reply

  12. Michelle Sagara
    May 29, 2011 @ 02:20:46

    I really should do something about a timeline. >.< I already found an issue between two books. Luckily, I'm unpublished, so I can still *fix* it. But it reminded me that I need to pay more attention to those things. I used to be able to keep all this stuff in my *head*. Alas, no more.

    This is why I have a timeline. I can’t keep it all in my head, and sometimes all I need at a given point is to know where characters in other parts of the world are on the day I’m writing Jewel in House Terafin. But if I didn’t have a timeline, I’d be rereading for dates. I did not, however, use a timeline like this one when I wrote my first books.

    Some of the things I struggled with, had to reread for, etc., in the first books caused me to change the way I approached the material that existed outside of the printed page; I did it purely to save myself future pain

    Outlines have become far, far harder with time. With my very first novel, I did write an outline. And then I changed it at the end of every day. Seriously. And then I gave up on changing it, and then I gave up on reading it because it was really very different. That was fine.

    What kills me about outlines now is that the only editor likely to ask for one is in an environment where outlines are taken seriously, so if the book changes radically in the process, it could cause difficulties.

    Writing an outline which mutated and changed and became distinctly irrelevant when no one but me would ever see any of it was hard enough; writing an outline that is read, paid for, an casts expectations over the finished book just kills me.

    Reply

  13. Lianne
    May 31, 2011 @ 10:21:41

    I don’t think there’s a PC version of VoodooPad, but I’d be really surprised if there wasn’t a similar application available for Windows.

    Well, there is TiddlyWiki, which is a free, single file java wiki. It comes as an html file, and each item you open opens in the same space. I’m using it for working out the details on a book I’m trying to write.

    Reply

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